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Twisted Colossus Construction Update #3

By on 09/27/2014

I wasn’t able to make it over to Six Flags Magic Mountain last weekend for a Twisted Colossus update, but I was able to make a quick stop there on Thursday. Most of the photos below are from Thursday, September 25th. I did make a quick stop this morning (Sep 27th) to see if anything had changed in the last two days, but it didn’t look like much had. I’ll be sure to call out the photos that are from today, but the clouds are the dead giveaway.

Since it was a Thursday, there were crews working on it and the big crane was in use. The first thing you notice as you approach the coaster from the parking lot was that there wasn’t much left of the first drop:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_11

All that’s really left of the first drop is the base structure:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_12

By the time I got to the other end, a couple of guys were back up in the basket working on it:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_05

This next shot was actually taken this morning. As you can see, there is virtually no change between Thursday and today, other than some new clouds:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_27

A side profile shot, also taken this morning:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_28

There is definitely a lot more track starting to show up and stored out front:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_03

There are even some curvy pieces starting to arrive, which will give it a definite twist:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_06

Thanks to Maverick for sending me this next photo, taken from inside the park today, showing even more new track being stored between Colossus and Goliath:

maverick

Photo © Maverick Muir

There was a guy working up on the lift hill, probably doing some more demolition work:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_01

I didn’t notice at first, but he had a buddy working with him underneath the hill:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_04

The guys up in the bucket were taking apart the coaster the easiest way possible…with a chainsaw. He would cut off a piece and then drop it down below (after yelling a warning):

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_07

Not much left of this section of track:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_09

You can see piles of rubble, presumably from what is being dropped from above as it’s cut off:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_08

The dark shadow you see inside the structure is a massive pile of wood that’s already been removed:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_29

Moving to the inside of the park, the track leaving the station is already starting to go in:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_15

In my Twisted Colossus construction update #1, I showed some flat metal pieces that I said attached to the top of the track where two pieces are joined. The previous photo shows this nicely. Once the two pieces of track are in place and securely bolted to the bents, a flat blue plate will be bolted on the top, covering the track joint and providing a perfectly smooth surface.

It’s not quite in the station yet, but they had to start somewhere:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_18

The track also continues around the corner and out of sight. Not sure how far it goes yet:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_21

The are using the existing footers from Colossus, saving them a lot of time and money. In my Twisted Colossus construction update #2, I showed some steel supports with flanges. It’s now obvious that those are the new bents that are being attached to the existing footers to support the track:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_22

Here’s a close-up of one that’s right down on top of the footer:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_16

This is an interesting device. I’m not sure if it’s a spreader to widen the track if the rails are too close to each other, or if it’s just a simple jig to ensure the proper width:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_19

It looks like they’re using the 1 1/2 ton winch to help them move the track into the proper position:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_17

Check out that precision fit! It just doesn’t get any better than that for a perfectly smooth ride:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_20

In the previous picture, each track piece has the same code welded onto the end. I’m assuming this is what tells them which piece goes where, and ensures they connect the right two pieces together.

The old Colossus exit has now been boarded up:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_23

Fortunately for me, the giant service door right there was wide open, providing a peek backstage. Unfortunately, there really wasn’t much going on. The track that had been sitting in that area was gone. I’m guessing that was the track that has already been installed. There are several new units of lumber sitting around:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_24

Speaking of new lumber, these guys were working hard at giving much of it a pretty white paint job:

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Despite the guys working on it earlier, there’s nothing new to see on the front of the lift hill:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_25

I couldn’t help but notice a tree by the station had the mark of death:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_13

A couple of trees right behind it also had the same markings:

SFMM_TCUpdate_20140927_14

That’s it for this weekend. I’ll be back over at the park on Friday to check-out Fright Fest. I should also be able to get back onto a regular cadence of providing weekly construction updates.

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17 Comments

  1. Dane. P

    09/27/2014 at 3:45 pm

    So have they altered the track in the station or is it just the lift hill?

  2. Aug

    09/27/2014 at 3:54 pm

    they also started working on the little airtime hills before the first lift hill

    • Byron

      09/27/2014 at 4:30 pm

      I’m still very confused by the pre lift bunny hops. Will they be before both lift hills?

      • Francisco O

        09/27/2014 at 5:09 pm

        I saw them in the animated video, and yes they are before the lift hill.

      • Aug

        09/28/2014 at 8:22 am

        just before the 1st lift hill

  3. Tyler Chinappi

    09/27/2014 at 4:21 pm

    in the future, magic mountain should use that HUGE empty space in the one picture for A LOT of flat rides/attractions so it will fill up that whole area so it’s not wasted space then give Scream a makeover/re-theme and repave the land it’s on so that whole section will be completed and won’t need to be touched for a VERY VERY, VERY long time

  4. Maverick Muir

    09/27/2014 at 4:57 pm

    That was me that made the gate wide open. It was shut when I got there and I was leaning against it and just opened all the way.

    • Eric

      09/27/2014 at 5:13 pm

      Sometimes those things just happen, huh? 😉

    • The Coaster Guy

      09/29/2014 at 3:47 pm

      It was actually closed when I got there as well. Several new employees emerged from the training center located behind the gate and opened it to get into the park, but then they didn’t close it behind them.

  5. Bo (@RollingCoasters)

    09/27/2014 at 5:11 pm

    Interesting thought here: Do you think that they may use the other side as well for a faster load/unload system? For example, the green track would make its way to that side of the station, but be faced reversed from how Colossus originally was. From there it’d go out, make a right turn, and go into the right side(where there is track) for loading? Think of it as how X2 was at first, except the load and unload stations are parallel to each other, not aligned.I figure this would be extremely helpful when it comes to time conservation. Pardon for not making this more clear 🙁

    • Bo (@RollingCoasters)

      09/27/2014 at 5:17 pm

      I take this back. Checked the POV video closely and realized that the green does in fact go straight into the station, with no wild load unload process. Oops, lol

  6. steve

    09/27/2014 at 7:25 pm

    Thanks Kurt, outstanding update as usual, really appreciate the time and effort you put in to bring us up to date news. Thanks.

  7. benjamin

    09/28/2014 at 1:11 am

    I noticed in the pictures that the crows nest on the left hill is now gone which neans one less staffing position. Heck they even get away with just 3 employees to run the ride. (one for load, one for unload, and one for breaks)

  8. Pingback: Twisted Colossus Pre-Lift Track Hills - The Coaster Guy - The Coaster Guy

  9. @TatsuDragon9

    09/29/2014 at 8:55 am

    I went to magic saturday and sunday and did my own construction update to myself. That track, Kurt, you mentioned in your 8th photo (the one that was taken from Goliath) is actually in place and moving along smoothly. Those are the bunny hops that they mentioned were going to be before the lift hill. When I saw them on saturday I started cheering because I want so bad for it to be the date that Twisted Colossus opens. You all WILL see me there at the gates at 7:00 am on that date!!!

  10. Pingback: Twisted Colossus Construction Update #4 - The Coaster Guy - The Coaster Guy

  11. Ellex

    10/31/2014 at 1:35 pm

    With all the hype of the new Twisted Colossus I’m not really impressed with it. I will miss the true Colossus Roller coaster. When I finally graduated from Marine Corps Boot camp in 1978 I couldn’t wait to ride Colossus. Now I admit The ride was very thrilling but quite painful as well with the NAD trains. We all know where those spots were and the accident thereafter. But when Six Flags acquired Magic mountain in 1979 and reprofiled the coaster and added the new PTC Trains, those were the best years of Colossus that I will always cherish. For a wooden coaster it was very smooth, fast and with awesome airtime. Six Flags Magic Mountain did a great job maintain colossus at that time. Magic Mountain could have done the same thing like what Cedar Fair has done with their Roller Coasters. Anchored more wood between the ledgers like they did with Shivering Timbers, Blue Streak, Mean Streak, Kings Island Racer etc. All of those coasters are much smoother. When they added the Morgan trains and the block brake, Colossus went down hill( no pun attended)and Colossus lost it’s punch. I Hope another amusement park will do a rebirth of the original Colossus.

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